Tag Archives: yosemite hiking

How should I train for the John Muir Trail?

If you are like us, you are already fantasizing about you upcoming summer trips. Your daydreams contain images of early morning mugs of coffee, spectacular alpine views, and high-fives as you summit a particularly challenging pass. This begs the question: How should I train for the John Muir Trail?

At SYMG we strongly believe that training can be FUN while also being effective. In general, the best way to train for hiking is to get outside and hike. However, there are some nuances that we would like to share. The difference between someone who has trained and someone who hasn’t is generally noticeable on day 1 of the trip. While we don’t offer a prescribed outline for training, we do offer general guidelines that have been “time tested” over the years. These guidelines can be typically summarized in five different categories:

  1. Cardio (aerobic capacity)
  2. Muscle strength (not just your legs!)
  3. Endurance (elevation not just distance)
  4. Acclimatization (easy to forget)
  5. Mental (head in the game)

Cardio: For most people, training for cardio can be the most accessible in terms of options. You can train for this in your living room, at your home gym or even a neighborhood park. There are a number of ways to train for cardio, so find one that fits your style best. Cycling, swimming, running or even just a fast walk on hilly terrain can all get the job done. The main thing with cardio training is to start with a set workout and then slowly increase it. You should feel your heart rate and respirations increasing without going “anaerobic” (panting for breath). The goal is to maximize the amount of time before you become anaerobic and to minimize your recovery time once you do. If you have access to a heart rate or power meter these can be helpful tools to monitor your progress. Otherwise, using a notebook to track your progress can also be beneficial.

Muscle Strength: Besides cardio training, it does help to spend some time specifically focused on building muscle strength. While many people still find climbing that first big pass to be tough, getting your muscles ready can help “soften the blow”. It’s easy to put all of your attention on building leg strength. Legs certainly do a lot of the “heavy lifting”, but you want to also consider shoulder and back exercises. These muscle groups do their fair share of the work as you’re lifting and carrying a backpack. Strong core support is also important to balancing on uneven terrain. Again, start with a baseline routine that feels moderately challenging and then take it up a notch each consecutive workout (while also listening to your body). Adding weight can also be valuable with your end goal to be at or beyond your anticipated total pack weight (including water weight).

Endurance: Building endurance takes time. It cannot be accomplished overnight, and this should be a key component to your workout plan. There are many ways to build endurance but you should consider the amount of time you are able to exercise for (at a moderate to difficult level) and what your recovery time is after your workout. This recovery time includes not only energy, but muscle strength and stability. Scheduling consecutive days can imitate what its like on some of our longer trips. We often remind people not to forget about training with elevation gain in mind rather than just distance. To be able to hike up 3,000’ ft to the top of a 10,000’+ pass (or even two) with a pack on, at elevation, is what you should focus on. The key is to be able to do this on consecutive days and still feel like you are having “fun” while doing it.

Acclimatization: This can be difficult to train for depending on what type of access you live near. If you have the ability to workout at a higher elevation you can incorporate this into your plan. If you live near sea level and don’t have access to elevation, increasing your cardio workout is helpful. Some guests have planned to arrive early to start the acclimatization process. If time doesn’t allow for this, not to worry! Many of our itineraries take this into consideration with shorter mileages and elevation gains built into the first couple days of your trip. Another tip that can help is to keep close tabs on your hydration on the days leading up to the trip and even during the first days while you are on the trip. Eating carbohydrates may also help the acclimatization process.

Mental: Mental training can be achieved using a few different methods. Having put the time in to train is certainly one aspect that can help you fee ready mentally as well as physically. One recommendation we give to newer backpackers is to take a personal trip using all of the gear and equipment they plan on using during their trip. This can really help familiarize with the camping essentials and make the transition between the trail-to-camp, and back-to-the-trail, a much easier process overall.

With any training plan, the main goal is that you are as prepared as possible for the investment of time and resources you have already made. Evacuating a trip is not anyone’s idea of a good time and is something we try to avoid if at all possible. Putting the time in before you arrive allows you to not only complete your trip but also have FUN while you are out on the trail. Being able to be fully present in the experience and appreciate the landscape makes putting in the hours to train totally worth it!

-Graham Ottley

SYMG Guide and General Manager

 

Be Here Now – Finding your Yosemite

By SYMG General Manager and Guide, Colby Brokvist

“The mountains will always be there. The trick is to make sure you are too.” 

Hervey Voge, Mountaineer’s Guide to the Sierra Nevada

It’s easy to get lost out there. Not in the mountains per se; a map and guide will serve you well in the backcountry. No, I’m talking about getting lost in all the clutter of work, errands and the daily grind. I’m talking about losing yourself, and I do it too. It seems like often enough there’s something I need to do and I have to work hard in order to make time to do the things I want to do.

For me, Yellowstone had been on my “want” list for years. Geysers, wolves and bison, despite their allure, had somehow never made it to my agenda. So, this past winter I finally made time to visit Yellowstone and it was everything I had imagined… and more. I would say that Yellowstone and Yosemite have that in common; you’ve heard the stories, seen pictures, and plan to visit the main attractions, yet when you are finally standing there you’re still left breathless.

The first time I visited Yosemite I fell in love and never left. Even just this year I stood in sight of Horsetail Falls for the famous “firefall” display at sunset for the first time. This is a phenomenon that is well-known but only happens on occasion. Each February there is only about a 12-day stretch where the light hits just at the required angle to turn the waterfall flaming orange. And that’s only when water and cloud conditions abide. Some years there is no display at all. And so here I am, after 13 years of living in the Yosemite area, I am still able to feel that same sense of exhilaration as when I first arrived, just by making the time to get outside.

All this to say that yes America’s National Parks house some of the world’s most unique landscapes, but there’s also much more going on behind the “scenes”. Our wilderness areas offer the opportunity to break the bonds of the daily grind and to toss off schedules and the barrage of social media. They are quiet, relaxing, and romantic. They set the stage for exploration, pushing one’s physical limits and for strengthening bonds between friends and family. National Parks are good for the soul.

In “The Three Amigos” Steve Martin’s character claims that “In a way, all of us have an El Guapo to face… and for some, it is the actual El Guapo”. I would also say that we all have own Yosemite to visit… and for some, it is the actual Yosemite. Face your Yosemite. Sure, it’s something you want to do, but maybe it’s also something you need to do for yourself.

Tech Tips: Meal Planning

Fresh veggie wraps along the Yosemite Grand Traverse.

Fresh veggie wraps along the Yosemite Grand Traverse.

Just because you’re in the backcountry doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy great food. At SYMG, we pride ourselves on cooking amazing food in amazing places and our “Backcountry Gourmet” cuisine has even been acclaimed in Sunset Magazine. Here are a few tips from seasoned (ha ha) John Muir Trail Guide Alex Steiner on backcountry chef-ing.

Many of our guests are surprised when we serve the first backcountry meal and it isn’t mac-and-cheese or something dehydrated in a pouch. While dehydrated foods can occasionally be lighter (keep in mind that you’ll need to pack out all the trash they create), they definitely don’t make the trip any easier. Having nutritious, fresh food provides better nutritional value and arguably creates an all around more enjoyable experience. If you’ve been eating nothing but dehydrated pasta sauce for 4 days, you won’t have quite as much pep-in-your-step as if you’ve been eating sea bass tacos with fresh guacamole.

I’d like to share some tricks-of-the-trade of a creative backcountry pantry.

  • First and foremost, be accurate in portioning food. There are certain averages that can be worked with for all sorts of food, and obviously, a group of teenage athletes will probably eat more than my grandparents, so there is some room for flex. That being said, when in doubt, hedge on being a little lighter for a comfortable carry while beefing up more nutritious items such as quinioa.
  • Tied to the first point, have calorie-dense snacks or desserts available if people are still hungry after a meal. Things like candied walnuts or cookies go a long way towards filling people up, can be eaten without any preparation, and are great for morale.
  • Have at least one fresh food every day, regardless of trip length. This one tip makes every meal something to look forward to. On day 21 of our 23 day John Muir Trail, my co-leader Wilson and I pulled out some green onions, a package of chevre (goat cheese), and some prosciutto (fancy Italian ham) for pizzas – no one could believe that we still had some good, fresh food left in our packs and it brightens everyone’s mood to still see real food.
  • Having fresh food is not easy and it needs to be packaged properly to last.

    ◦      Know the shelf life of your food – i.e., kale will keep much longer than spinach, so eat the spinach first.

    ◦      Keep things that need to stay cold all together in one stuff sack or bear can. I pack all the cheeses and vegetables in a bear can and put the whole bear can in the refrigerator. Then, when I’m hiking, I put this bear can in the center of my backpack, and always out of the sun. Consider freezing some items as well.

    ◦      Package things like tomatoes and fragile fruit tightly, but not squished, in hard tupperware-like containers. If there is empty space, stuff it with paper towel.

    ◦      Certain types of produce such as leafy greens can turn bad fairly quickly without refrigeration. Besides bringing more stable substitutes, another is to wrap the produce in dry paper towel.

Going into the backcountry is an amazing experience, there’s no reason not to have equally amazing food. I’m looking forward to hiking with you all this coming season. Bon appetite!